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Bouvet
"The solitary ice-covered shield volcano of Bouvet Island is located just off the Southwest Indian Ridge, east of the triple junction between the African, South American, and Antarctic plates. The 780-m-high basaltic-to-rhyolitic island, also referred to as Bouvetoya, was discovered by and later named for Captain Lozier-Bouvet during his 1739 search for the "great southern continent." About 95% of the uninhabited 10-km-wide island is covered by glaciers. The most prominent feature is the 3.5-km-wide Wilhelmplataet caldera, which is breached to the sea on the NW side. A late-stage rhyolitic lava dome forms the Cape Valdivia peninsula on the northern flank. The latest dated eruption produced a lava flow at Cape Meteor on the eastern flank about 2000 years ago."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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