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Tata Sabaya
"The symmetrical Tata Sabaya stratovolcano towers above the northern end of the Salar de Coipasa in the Altiplano of Bolivia. A pyroclastic shield capped by lava domes was topped by effusive eruptions that formed an unglaciated andesitic stratovolcano. Collapse of this edifice produced a large late-Pleistocene debris avalanche that swept into the Salar de Coipasa and covered an area of more than 300 sq km south of the volcano, traveling up to 30 km. Tufa deposits on avalanche hummocks in the Salar de Coipasa correspond to a ca. 12,000 year old high stand of the lake. Renewed eruptions during the Holocene constructed lava domes and flows that have restored much of the original edifice, producing the present-day stratovolcano, whose summit is formed by a 5430-m-high lava dome. Youthful lava flows extend down the NW and western flanks of the volcano, and pyroclastic-flow deposits from partial collapse of the summit dome extend to the lower SW flank."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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