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Ecuador
"Volcán Ecuador straddles the equator at the NW end of Isabela Island. The western side of the volcano, the smallest of the six large shield volcanoes on Isabela, is broadly breached by edifice collapse, and youthful lava flows cover much of the caldera floor. Two large pyroclastic cones were constructed along the coast, and several chains of spatter cones and small scoria cones cross the caldera floor, which has a prominent bench on its southern side. A single dark-colored aa lava flow covers about half of the caldera floor. A number of young lava flows reach the coast to form Cape Berkeley, west of a large youthful-looking tuff cone. Extending from the outer eastern flanks of the main edifice is a line of NE-trending fissure-fed vents that connect Volcán Ecuador (also known as Cape Berkeley volcano) with Volcán Wolf. Volcán Ecuador is the only Isabela Island volcano without historical eruptions. However, the youthful morphology of its most recent lava flows resembles those of very recent flows on other Isabela Island volcanoes."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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