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Kaguyak
"The small, but spectacular 2.5-km-wide Kaguyak caldera in the NE part of Katmai National Park is filled by a >180-m-deep lake whose surface lies more than 550 m below the caldera rim. Kaguyak volcano is only 901 m high, but rises directly from lowland areas near sea level south of the Big River. Initially considered to be a typical stratovolcano truncated by a caldera, the pre-caldera edifice has been shown to consist of nine continuguous late-Pleistocene lava dome clusters, most of which lie east of the present caldera. A large post-caldera lava dome extends into the lake on the SW side and another dome forms a small island in the center of the lake. The youthful caldera is unglaciated, and distal tephras from the caldera-forming eruption have been radiocarbon dated at about 5800 years before present. Voluminous dacitic pyroclastic-flow deposits surround the caldera and reached Shelikof Strait to the SE."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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