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Emmons Lake
"The massive Emmons Lake stratovolcano, located north of Volcano Bay and SW of Pavlof volcano, is truncated by one of the largest calderas of the Aleutian arc. The 11 x 18 km caldera contains a narrow elongated lake at its SW end that drains through a breach in the SE caldera rim to the Pacific Ocean. The compound caldera was formed during six voluminous dacitic-to-rhyolitic eruptions between about 294,000 and 26,000 years ago that produced extensive ashflow tuffs. Mount Emmons, Mount Hague, and Double Crater are post-caldera cones of dominantly basaltic composition that were constructed along the SW-NE trend of the elongated caldera, which is up to 1150 m deep. Some young Holocene flows have moved through a gap in the southern caldera rim to within 3 km of the Pacific Ocean. A large fumarolic area is located on the south side of Mount Hague, and the only reported historical activity from Emmons Lake volcano was the emission of steam plumes from Hague in 1990 and 1991."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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