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Tanaga
"Tanaga volcano, the second largest volcanic center of the central Aleutians, is the central and highest of three youthful stratovolcanoes oriented along a roughly E-W line at the NW tip of Tanaga Island. Arcuate ridges to the east and south represent the rim of an arcuate caldera formed by collapse of an ancestral Tanaga volcano during the Pleistocene. Most Holocene eruptions originated from Tanaga volcano itself, which consists of two large cones, the western of which is the highest, constructed within a caldera whose 400-m-high rim is prominent to the SE. At the westernmost end of the Tanaga complex is conical Sajaka, a 1304-m-high double cone that may be the youngest of the three volcanoes. Sajaka One volcano collapsed during the late Holocene, producing a debris avalanche that swept into the sea, after which Sajaka Two cone was constructed within the collapse scarp."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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