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Ksudach
"Ksudach is unique among Kamchatka volcanoes in its morphology and geologic history. It is a large, low-angle stratovolcano, constructed of alternating basaltic-andesitic lavas and dacitic pyroclastics, and is truncated by an intricate complex of five calderas. An array of post-caldera structures at Ksudach is truncated by later calderas, the last three of which formed during the Holocene, about 7900 and 5000 BC and about 240 AD. The latter eruption was the second largest in Kamchatka during the Holocene, and produced about 20 cu km of rhyodacitic airfall tephra and 3-4 cu km of pyroclastic flows. The eastern part of the caldera complex contains two lakes, the northern of which forms an embayment in Stubel Crater, a low-angle cone that began forming about 1600 years ago in the youngest caldera. The only historical eruption of Ksudach, in 1907, originated from Stubel Crater and was one of Kamchatka's largest in historical time."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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