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Hakone
"Hakone volcano is truncated by two overlapping calderas, the largest of which is 10 x 11 km wide. The calderas were formed as a result of two major explosive eruptions about 180,000 and 49,000-60,000 years ago. Scenic Lake Ashi lies between the SW caldera wall and a half dozen post-caldera lava domes that were constructed along a SW-NE trend cutting through the center of the calderas. Dome growth occurred progressively to the south, and the largest and youngest of these, Kami-yama, forms the high point of Hakone. The calderas are breached to the east by the Haya-kawa canyon. A phreatic explosion about 3000 years ago was followed by collapse of the NW side of Kami-yama, damming the Haya-kawa valley and creating Lake Ashi. The latest magmatic eruptive activity at Hakone about 2900 years ago produced a pyroclastic flow and a lava dome in the explosion crater, although phreatic eruptions took place as recently as the 12-13th centuries AD. Seismic swarms have occurred at Hakone during the 20th century. Lake Ashi, along with major thermal areas in the caldera, forms a popular resort area SW of Tokyo."  -Smithsonian Volcano Archive
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